Your Questions About Dutch Betting System



Richard asks…

How can I Dutch bet 2 or more horses for a desired Profit? Please show formula?

If I want to have a profit of let’s say $25 with

Horse A at 3:1 odds, and
Horse B at 5:1 odds

I can’t figure out the formula that makes sense. I’d like to run it in Excel for fun

Thanks in advance
I think my request may need clarifying;

I am looking to Learn the Formula….not to find a calculator. But thank you.

My example is that I wish to arrive at a specific Profit of $25, where
Horse A has odds of 3:1, and
Horse B has odds of 5:1
How much do I need to Bet on each, and the math behind it…

I would like the math behind the answer so I may learn the math, and be able to do it myself, with different odds, and different Profit targets. Calculators are fine, but I can’t post a calculator in Excel. I’d prefer to learn it and make my own calculations knowing where the math is coming from.

Many thanks tho

Denny answers:

When i`m dutching i use the reverse the odds system,and can play up to 4 horses
Lets say my 4 horses odds are
4/1
6/1
10/1
15/1
Turn the odds into cash and bet the lowest amount on the highest odds ..etc
$4 on 15/1
$6 on 10/1
$10 on 6/1
$15 on 4/1

Total amount bet: $35

4/1 pays $10/ $15 bet returns $75= $40 Profit
6/1 pays $ 14/$10 bet returns $70 =$35 Profit
10/1 pays $22/$6 bet returns $66 =$31 Profit
15/1 pays $32/ $4bet returns $64=$29 Profit
Good Luck!

Your selections were
3/1
5/1

Start with the reverse odds system
Amount Bet:$8

3/1 pays $8/$5 bet returns $20 = Profit $12
5/1 pays $12/$3 bet returns $18 = Profit $10

To make a $25 Profit or more

Double your bet/ $10- $6 = $24 & $20
Triple your bet/ $15 – $9 = $36 & $30

Lisa asks…

Is dutching bets legal? If so, how come more people aren’t doing it?

Someone told me recently about dutching bets, where you spread your money on various outcomes to always ensure you get a profit. Is this legal?
If so then how come more people don’t do it?

Denny answers:

Dutching has been around for a very long time, is legal and is a proportional betting method which lets the player bet several runners in the same race. If done correctly, the bet will return the same amount of profit regardless of which pick wins. Most handicappers do this anyway without using the term dutching. The golden rule in horse racing is to eliminate horses that you think are not capable of winning and identify value bets from the remaining horses. Most players and handicapping services do a good job of narrowing the contenders in each race down to 3 or four runners. Being able to bet on ALL the horses we figure have a good chance of winning means we will win a lot more bets.

The only drawback to betting on multiple entries is that even when we win we always have some losing tickets – after all, only one horse can win. Therefore the profit we can make on a given race drops as we add more horses to the Dutch. The good news is that we will now win most of the time.

Some Hedge their bets..When hedging a bet we bet just enough on the pick so that if it wins we break even instead of making the desired profit. This can be very important if one of our picks is going off at very low odds which otherwise would lower the profit and greatly increase the cost of the Dutch. So bottom-line all the above is relevant to exotic betting. Always make sure that you base your stakes according to the prices of the horses involved. As much as possible, try not to leave out the favorite in all of the races you will bet on as long as the prices are not too short. If you do not include favorites, you are guaranteed at least 1 in 5 lose each time you do live wagers. Only go for horses that you strongly believe will win the race. This system is NOT limited to the dutching technique, but is used in every horse racing system that is use.

Here’s a link that you may find interesting regarding Dutching, the article is a couple years old, but is still a great insight to educate-

http://www.abc-casinos.com/articles/showarticles.php?AID=00017
:)

Linda asks…

What does the term “going Dutch” mean, when going out to eat?

I have a small party to orchestrate to take out to dinner, & I was told by the hostess that everyone is to “pay for themselves, we’ll go Dutch“. So I need to know what I’m working with. It’s about 10 people.
PS-You’ve all answered my question-so I thank you all. To “sherrysfu”-I wouldn’t dream of burdening the waiter/waitress with 10 seperate tabs, it’s obnoxious. Even if we all pay for our own meals, or each other, or whatever, the monies get pooled. They won’t be divided for the poor server. But I thank you for your concern on their behalf :-)

Denny answers:

Going dutch is a phrase where you pay for your own food and drinks

.Going Dutch is a slang term that means that each person eating at a restaurant or paying admission for entertainment pays for himself or herself, rather than one person paying for everyone. It is also called Dutch date or Dutch treat.

Etiquette

There is a delicate etiquette surrounding going Dutch. It may be accepted in some situations, such as between non-intimate friends or less affluent people, but considered stingy in other circumstances, such as on a romantic date or at a business lunch.

The traditional way to handle a bill on a romantic date in the West has been that the one who invited the other (traditionally, nearly always the man) takes the bill and the invitee may not even know the actual price of the meal. Some restaurants keep ladies’ menus without prices.

Etymology

The phrase “going Dutch” probably originates from Dutch etiquette. In the Netherlands, it is not unusual to pay separately when dating. The Dutch were already internationally known as scrooges, and English rivalry with The Netherlands especially during the period of the Anglo-Dutch Wars gave rise to several phrases including Dutch that promote certain negative stereotypes. Examples include Dutch courage, Dutch uncle and Dutch wife. The particular stereotype associated with this usage is the idea of Dutch people as ungregarious and selfish.

In Spain, “going Dutch” is attributed to Catalans, due to a stereotype that they are greedy. A stereotypical non-Catalan Spaniard would compete to invite the group.

In Italy, the expression pagare alla romana can be translated as: “To pay like people of Rome” or “to pay like they do in Rome”. It has the same meaning as “going Dutch”.

Curiously, in South American countries exist the Spanish phrase pagar a la americana (literally “To pay American style”) which refers to a trait attributed to people from the U.S.A. Or Canada.

The gambling term dutching may follow this same route as it describes a system that shares stakes across a number of bets. It is commonly believed, however, that the Dutch reference here was in fact derived from a gangster (Dutch Schultz) who used this strategy to profit from racing.

[edit] Feminist support for Dutch date practice

During the advent of second wave feminism, the late 1960s and 1970s, the women’s movement encouraged women to understand aspects of their own personal lives as deeply politicized. Many feminists investigated the framework and assumptions of traditional courtship roles. They subscribed to the idea that there should be equality of the sexes, not just legally, but socially and sexually.

They thought that it was mature, empowering and self-respecting for women to pay their own way in romantic dates. They were rejecting traditional gender role assumptions that men should make more money and should pay for affections through dinners and the rest of costs of dates. In this way, women were making an equal investment in the cost of courtship.

It became more common for women to pay their own way, or to pay for men’s meals. Some women were offended if their male dining partner “grabbed the check.”

Ironically the majority of women still see the value of this ‘tradition’ for the man to pay for meals in relationships.

[edit] Effective end of Dutch practice

Since the 1990s, mores, particularly in the US, have reverted to past customs.

More women have abandoned 1970s feminism’s ideals for equality of gender roles and relationships. More women have reverted to adopting traditional, that is, unequal views of the courting relationship, and assumptions about men’s responsibility to spend money to express affection.

Thus, a gesture has arisen to test a man’s adherence to the return to traditional courtship roles: In the last 10 years in the US, a further twist to the woman’s offering to pay their own way has occurred. These women will generally offer to pay their part of the meal, but if the man agrees, the woman will assume that he is not interested in her and she will then decline to meet him again.

Mandy asks…

Is this true about Dutch men?

I always hear that they are cheap or really tight with money (going Dutch), is that true? I didn’t think the ones I know were, but I guess I can’t be sure. Why do people group them all like that, what do you think about it?

Denny answers:

Those negative terms (stereotypes) about the Dutch in the ENGLISH LANGUAGE are from the time when the Netherlands and Britain were at war with each other (four Anglo-Dutch wars from 1652 to 1784). Proof of this is in the fact that in other languages like German, French, Spanish or Portugese there are no such terms about the Dutch…

Dutch men are no more or less cheap than any other nationality as a group, some Dutch men are extremely tight with money while others spend it like water… “Going Dutch” is an English expression and doesn’t say anything about modern day dutchmen, perhaps it does say something about the Dutch of several centuries ago, but it probably says more about the British of a few centuries ago…

From Wikipedia;

“… In the Netherlands, it is not unusual to pay separately when going out as a group. When dating in a 1 on 1 situation however, the man will most commonly pay for meals and drinks. English rivalry with The Netherlands especially during the period of the Anglo-Dutch Wars gave rise to several phrases including Dutch that promote certain negative stereotypes. Examples include Dutch courage, Dutch uncle and Dutch wife. The particular stereotype associated with this usage is the idea of Dutch people as ungenerous and selfish.

In Spain, “going Dutch” is attributed to Catalans, due to a stereotype that they are somewhat penny-pinchers. A stereotypical non-Catalan Spaniard would compete to pay the bill for the group.

In Italy, the expression pagare alla romana can be translated as: “To pay like people of Rome” or “to pay like they do in Rome”. It has the same meaning as “going Dutch”.

Some South American countries use the Spanish phrase pagar a la americana (literally “To pay American style”) which refers to a trait attributed to people from the U.S.A. Or Canada.

In Argentina specifically, ‘a la romana’ (exact translation of Italian’s ‘pagare alla romana’) is widely used and ‘pagar a la americana’ (pay American style) doesn’t exist.

The gambling term dutching may follow this same route as it describes a system that shares stakes across a number of bets. It is commonly believed, however, that the Dutch reference here was in fact derived from a gangster (Dutch Schultz) who used this strategy to profit from racing.”

About the Anglo-Dutch wars;

“…The United Provinces (Netherlands) were the first country to salute the American flag, and Great Britain was ever after suspicious of the Dutch. …”

.

… And now they hate us for having a better national football team ;-)

Mark asks…

why is going halfsies on a date called Dutch?

is that cause the Dutch are not notoriusly cheap or something?

Denny answers:

The phrase “going Dutch” probably originates from Dutch etiquette. In the Netherlands, it is not unusual to pay separately when dating. The Dutch were already internationally known as scrooges, and English rivalry with The Netherlands especially during the period of the Anglo-Dutch Wars gave rise to several phrases including Dutch that promote certain negative stereotypes. Examples include Dutch courage, Dutch uncle and Dutch wife. The particular stereotype associated with this usage is the idea of Dutch people as ungregarious and selfish.

In Spain, “going Dutch” is attributed to Catalans, due to a stereotype that they are greedy. A stereotypical non-Catalan Spaniard would compete to invite the group.

In Italy, the expression pagare alla romana can be translated as: “To pay like people of Rome” or “to pay like they do in Rome”. It has the same meaning as “going Dutch”.

Curiously, in South American countries exist the Spanish phrase pagar a la americana (literally “To pay American style”) which refers to a trait attributed to people from the U.S.A. Or Canada.

The gambling term dutching may follow this same route as it describes a system that shares stakes across a number of bets. It is commonly believed, however, that the Dutch reference here was in fact derived from a gangster (Dutch Schultz) who used this strategy to profit from racing.

Jenny asks…

Can betting odds be used as prediction markets? Are they the same?

Denny answers:

Yes, they can.

Http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prediction_market

http://info.phys.unm.edu/~caves/reports/dutchbook.pdf

Depends on the structure of the betting system. If you can set up a Dutch book, then they aren’t the same:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dutch_book

With a system like simple parimutuel, they are:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parimutuel_betting

(with complex parimutuels, the odds can become incoherent)

David asks…

Where does the saying :”Go dutch” originate from.?

It is used mostly in conjunction with sharing the bill at a restaurant.

Denny answers:

The phrase “going Dutch” probably originates from Dutch etiquette. In the Netherlands, it is not unusual to pay separately when going out as a group. When dating in a 1 on 1 situation however, the man will most commonly pay for meals and drinks. English rivalry with The Netherlands especially during the period of the Anglo-Dutch Wars[citation needed] gave rise to several phrases including Dutch that promote certain negative stereotypes. Examples include Dutch courage, Dutch uncle and Dutch wife. The particular stereotype associated with this usage is the idea of Dutch people as ungenerous and selfish.
In Spain, “going Dutch” is attributed to Catalans, due to a stereotype that they are somewhat penny-pinchers. A stereotypical non-Catalan Spaniard would compete to pay the bill for the group. However, the common term for “going Dutch” bears no relationship to Catalonia: “pagar a escote” (“cleavage paying”).
In Italy, the expression pagare alla romana can be translated as: “To pay like people of Rome” or “to pay like they do in Rome”. It has the same meaning as “going Dutch”.
Some South American countries use the Spanish phrase pagar a la americana (literally “To pay American style”) which refers to a trait attributed to people from the U.S.A. Or Canada.
In Argentina specifically, ‘a la romana’ (exact translation of Italian’s ‘pagare alla romana’) is widely used and ‘pagar a la americana’ (pay American style) doesn’t exist.
The gambling term dutching may follow this same route as it describes a system that shares stakes across a number of bets. It is commonly believed, however, that the Dutch reference here was in fact derived from a gangster (Dutch Schultz) who used this strategy to profit from racing.

Ruth asks…

Do you remember a horse racing system from the 1980′s or 1990′s titled “playing bookie with the bookie?”?

I bought it, for £10.00, it was a small booklet, privately produced. Involved betting on 2 horses in one race and aiming to win a certain amount of money. Claimed to win around 3,000 points a year.

Don’t recall who wrote it, but would like to buy a copy. New or used is okay. Do you know if it is being sold still and where I can buy it from?

Denny answers:

Hi,

Interestingly enough I have heard of it. Have you tried using Ebay to do a search for this?

Alternatively there may actually be variations of this system today that exist. It may have revolved around dutch betting the 2nd and 3rd favourites to win the same amount with a running target or daily target where you stop when you get a winner. This may also work as a variation or a general idea.

Cheers,
Mark

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